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News & Press: ISPLS

Surveying bills move forward as legislative session enters final days

Tuesday, March 10, 2020   (0 Comments)
Posted by: Evan Hoffmeyer, Senior Communications Coordinator
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The governor will soon receive dozens of bills for consideration, including up to four that would impact land surveyors in the state.

 

Lawmakers passed a bill allowing homeowners to restore/reconstruct nonconforming residential single-family homes within their existing footprint. After ceremonial signatures from legislative leaders, SB 100: Right to Restore or Reconstruct a Dwelling will head to Gov. Eric Holcomb for consideration. To qualify, the homes can only be nonconforming as to lot size, setbacks or other dimensional requirements; be habitable as an assessed residential property; and not have been condemned.

 

Three more bills were sent to conference committees to reconcile differences between their House and Senate versions:

  • HB 1008: Occupational License Endorsement - Licensed professionals - including surveyors - who get their license in another state and then move to Indiana, would more easily be able to then get licensed here. If the professional can prove they've passed a "substantially equivalent examination" to Indiana's exam and are in good standing, they would only need to pay a fee and complete an application form to get licensed in Indiana.
  • HB 1014: Plan Commissions - For the purposes of the advisory planning law, the bill would require a county surveyor's designee to be a resident of the county to serve on the county plan commission, regardless of if they are a permanent designee or only filling a vacancy or serving as an alternate.
  • SB 229: Maintenance of Regulated Drains - A permit would no longer be required from the Indiana Dept. of Environmental Management for the reconstruction or maintenance of regulated drains for purposes of the law concerning state-regulated wetlands. Practicing land surveyor and ISPLS member State Sen. Blake Doriot, R-Elkhart, is a co-author of this bill and an adviser to the conference committee.

We will soon know the fate of all these bills as the legislative session is legally required to end no later than 11:59 p.m. EDT this Saturday, March 14. The governor has seven calendar days to sign or veto a bill from the time it hits his desk. If he hasn't acted by then, it automatically becomes law without his signature on the eighth day.

Updates on all these bills will be included in next week's ISPLS newsletter and here on ISPLS.org through the rest of the legislative session.


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